7 Lies We Have To Stop Telling About Latina Women In America

A key contributing factor is that nearly half of young adult workers (48%) were employed in higher-risk industries in February, compared with 24% of workers overall. Job losses for older workers were also sizable, ranging from 9% to 13%, but less severe than for young adults. The pattern of job losses by age in the COVID-19 recession is generally consistent with the pattern in the Great Recession and in previous recessions. In a Pew Research Center survey conducted April 29-May 5 young adults ages 18 to 29 were also more likely than older Americans to say that they have lost a job or taken a pay cut because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“You need laws and you need structures that lead the way to gender equality,” said Prime Minister Sanna Marin of Finland, the second-youngest head of government in the world, in a CNN interview. “It just doesn’t happen by itself.” In Finland, for example, the law requires that the proportion of men and women serving in certain governmental, municipal and intermunicipal bodies be equal to at least 40 percent for both groups. As Brazil and Spain are not disaggregated as Hispanic origin options in the Current Population Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, it is not possible to distinguish between Hispanic women and Latinas in the dataset we used for our regression analysis.

Women also hold an unequal share of the nation’s outstanding student-loan debt — two-thirds of the pie, according to the American Association of University Women — despite the fact that fewer women have college degrees. While women are attending college at a higher rate than men (56 percent of four-year-college enrollees were women in 2017), enrollment figures don’t match their share of student loan debt. There are other reasons why women are paid less than men, despite being in similar career fields, holding equivalent degrees, and working in the same parts of the country. For women at the higher end of the earning scale, promotions and raises are often subjective. This can leave them open to discrimination and bias, which can be especially harmful for women of color.

Hazen AL, Connelly CD, Soriano FI, Landsverk JA. Intimate partner violence and psychological functioning in Latina women. Rodriguez MA, Heilemann MV, Fielder E, Ang A, Nevarez F, Mangione CM. Intimate partner violence, depression, and PTSD among pregnant Latina women. Bauer HM, Rodriguez MA, Perez-Stable EJ. Prevalence and determinants of intimate partner abuse among public hospital primary care patients. ‡IPV exposure included women who reported any IPV since age 18 according to the BRFSS or WEB questions. †Categories of abuse are not mutually exclusive; for example, women who are positive for BRFSS psychological abuse, may also have BRFSS physical abuse.

Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates are lower for Asian and Pacific Islander women than for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women . Five-year breast cancer-specific survival shows the percentage of people who have not died from breast cancer 5 years after diagnosis. Some people have metastatic breast cancer when they are first diagnosed . The breast cancer incidence rate among women in 2009 was 131 and the estimated breast cancer incidence rate in 2016 was also 131 . This means there were 131 breast cancer cases per 100,000 women in the U.S. population in both time periods.

Black and Latina women are particularly at risk for being seen as angry when they fail to conform to these restrictive norms. A biologist noted that she tends to speak her mind very directly, as do her male colleagues. LATINA Style Magazine is the most influential publication reaching the contemporary Hispanic woman. LATINA Style broke new ground in 1994 by launching the first national magazine dedicated to the needs and concerns of the contemporary Latina professional working woman and the Latina business owner in the United States. With a national circulation of 150,000 and a readership of nearly 600,000, LATINA Style reaches both the seasoned professional and the young Latina entering the workforce for the first time.

Her first job was in a shoe store as she helped her mother pay the rent and save money to bring her three sisters to America, she says. “We would expect that if you had a more educated group you would see some of these gaps narrow,” Mora says. Ernie Tedeschi, a researcher at Evercore ISI in Washington, says rising educational attainment and possibly “shifting cultural norms” in Hispanic families are also driving Latina workforce engagement. The importance of Hispanic women in the workforce is expected to increase. By 2028, they are forecast to account for 9.2% of the total labor force, up from 7.5% in 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While the federal minimum wage acts as an equalizer between genders, women of color are over-represented among low-wage earner. While they account for 17 percent of the total workforce, they make up 33 percent of workers in fast-growing, low-wage jobs like those in fast food, retail, and home health aid work.

I spent two years living fully nomadic, mostly traveling solo, and meeting people through social media. Everything from countries of origin, to social class, to where raised, to education, to non-sociological factors like being who you are and liking what you like impacts who we are. She pretty much hit the nail on the head as far as dating http://omcns.com/2019/12/29/the-war-against-costa-rican-girls/. I don’t know what that other guy is talking about but one thing you should know is almost all Latina women won’t put up with a cheater.

In fact, the pay gap is widest among Latina women with a college education, and widens as higher levels of education are obtained. Latinas with advanced degrees only make two-thirds of the salary of their white male counterparts on average, and a similar discrepancy exists for bachelor’s degree and high-school degree holders. Latinas without a high school degree make 27 percent less than white men with similar educational backgrounds.

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Hispanic women have slightly lower rates of breast cancer screening than non-Hispanic black women and non-Hispanic white women . Hispanic/Latina women may be less likely than non-Hispanic white women to get appropriate and timely breast cancer care . However, whether this affects breast cancer survival in Hispanic/Latina is not known at this time . Although breast cancer survival in Black women has increased over time, survival rates remain lower than among white women . Non-Hispanic Asian American women have slightly lower rates of breast cancer screening than non-Hispanic black women and non-Hispanic white women .

We know what it will take to reduce hardship during the pandemic and the long recovery that lies ahead. A flexible emergency fund of at least $10 billion could help families left out of other relief measures meet their basic needs. In addition, funds for housing assistance would help families and individuals with high housing burdens avoid evictions, and a 15 percent increase in the monthly SNAP benefit would reduce food insecurity, especially among households with the most limited incomes. Continued expansions of unemployment insurance would help families to afford the basics until they are able to return to work. Housing consumes such a large share of low-income households’ budgets that even before the pandemic, they sometimes had to forgo food, medicine, or other necessities to keep a roof over their heads.

Most of these jobs don’t come with paid sick leave or health insurance and can’t be done remotely; some are deemed essential, so these workers are at higher risk of exposure to COVID-19. Although data are limited, non-Hispanic American Indian and non-Hispanic Alaska Native women have slightly lower rates of breast cancer screening than non-Hispanic black women and non-Hispanic white women .

However, in Northern Virginia and Atlanta a higher percentage of Latina women complete 5+ years of college than Latino men do. Latina immigrants also lack a “substantial amount” of English proficiency, as discovered in IWPR’s 2008 research. This language barrier plays a significant role in the Latina educational experience and progress.

To further comment on the type of abuse women reported, we defined two categories of abuse based on the BRFSS questions. Women were defined as having experienced “physical IPV” if they reported physical and/or sexual abuse, and they were defined as having experienced “psychological IPV” if they reported threats and/or controlling behavior. The data were collapsed into these two broad abuse categories in order to provide meaningful estimates due to the small number of Latina women. “I Go Red for myself, my family and all Hispanic women,” Maricela proudly declares.